Monday, March 21, 2011

The Eskimo village on the lake disappeared Anjikuni


Occasionally the police still try again to discover the cause for which an entire village of 1200 inhabitants and even the dead from their graves, vanished without a trace in the darkness of winter.The mystery began in 1930 when the hunter Arnand Laurent and his two children saw a strange flash across the sky north of Canada. Laurent said the light changed shape at times, so that in a moment was cylindrical and the next like a huge bullet.
Imagen de un poblado del norte de Canada
A few days later, a couple of mounted police officers on their way from Lake Anjikuni stopped Laurent's cabin in search of a coat. One of them explained that the lake had "something of a problem." The policeman asked Laurent confused if the light had been on his way to the lake and was told yes.
The policeman nodded without comment, in the years following the Laurent again questioned. That was an understandable oversight since the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and was occupied at the time with the strangest of his story ...
When another hunter named Joe Labelle, marched with his snowshoes to the lakeside town Anjikuni, felt overwhelmed by a strange sense of dread. Typically, this was a rowdy rural town of twelve hundred people and that day, Joe would have expected to hear the dogs barking sled to give his usual welcome.
But the huts surrounded by snow were held in silence, and did not leave any fire Hun.
Passing along the shore of Lake Anjikuni, the hunter saw the boats and kayaks were still moored to the shore. However, when you went door to door, but found a mysterious solitude. They were still leaning against the door the men's rifles appreciated. Eskimo no traveler would ever his rifle at home.
Inside the cabins, caribou stew pots were moldy on the fires extinguished long ago. On a bed had a parka patched half and two bone needles with the garment.
Labelle but found no bodies, neither alive nor dead, nor signs of violence.
In some, a time of normal day-about lunch it seemed, there was a sudden interruption in the daily work, but that life and time seemed to have stopped dead.
Joe Labelle went to the telegraph office and sent its report to the headquarters of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. All available officers were dispatched to the scene of Anjikuni. After a few hours of searching, the troopers came upon the lost dog sleds. Were tied to trees near the village and their bodies were under a solid layer of snow. Had died of hunger and cold.
In what was the Anjikuni cemetery, there was another chilling discovery. Now, it was a large open graves, of which, under a frigid temperature, someone had taken the bodies.
There were no footprints outside the village, nor any means of transport by which people might have fled. Unable to believe that twelve hundred people could vanish from the face of the earth, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police expanded their search. Over time, the investigation covered all of Canada and would continue for years. But after so many years, the case remains unresolved.

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